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Genetics News
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:54:36 EDT
Factor in naked mole rat's cells enhances protein integrity
A factor in naked mole rat cells could be one of the secrets to how the rodent defies aging, researchers say. Naked mole rats, which burrow through underground tunnels in their native East Africa, are nearly hairless rodents. They live as long as 32 years. Naked mole rats maintain cancer-free good health and reproductive potential well into their third decade of life.
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:54:34 EDT
Surprising discovery: HIV hides in gut, evading eradication
Some surprising discoveries about the body's initial responses to HIV infection have been made by researchers. One of the biggest obstacles to complete viral eradication and immune recovery is the stable HIV reservoir in the gut. There is very little information about the early viral invasion and the establishment of the gut reservoir. “We want to understand what enables the virus to invade the gut, cause inflammation and kill the immune cells,” said the study's lead author.
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:54:59 EDT
How Ebola blocks immune system
Researchers have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies.
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:59:15 EDT
Ready for mating at the right time: How pheromones signal mating cues in tilapia
Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia: this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females.
Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:34:22 EDT
Not all phytoplankton in the ocean need to take their vitamins
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, which can grow so big it can be seen from space, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), researchers have discovered. Until now, many marine microbes with cells that have a nucleus -- eukaryotes -- were thought to depend on other organisms to produce thiamine. If this were the case, B1 would be a major factor in controlling the growth of algae such as E. huxleyi.
Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:27:52 EDT
How the zebrafish gets its stripes: Uncovering how beautiful color patterns can develop in animals
The zebrafish, a small fresh water fish, owes its name to a striking pattern of blue stripes alternating with golden stripes. Three major pigment cell types, black cells, reflective silvery cells, and yellow cells emerge during growth in the skin of the tiny juvenile fish and arrange as a multi-layered mosaic to compose the characteristic color pattern. While it was known that all three cell types have to interact to form proper stripes, the embryonic origin of the pigment cells that develop the stripes of the adult fish has remained a mystery up to now. Scientists have now discovered how these cells arise and behave to form the 'zebra' pattern.
Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:27:50 EDT
New type of cell movement discovered
Scientists have used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine.
Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:27:44 EDT
New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits
The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. The study gives answers to many genetic questions.
Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:27:36 EDT
From bite site to brain: How rabies virus hijacks and speeds up transport in nerve cells
Rabies is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal into muscle tissue of the new host. From there, the virus travels all the way to the brain where it multiplies and causes the usually fatal disease. A new article sheds light on how the virus hijacks the transport system in nerve cells to reach the brain with maximal speed and efficiency.
Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:58:55 EDT
Small molecule acts as on-off switch for nature's antibiotic factory: Tells Streptomyces to either veg out or get busy
Biochemists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. Their hope now would be to see whether it is possible to manipulate this switch to make nature's antibiotic factory more efficient.
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