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Genetics News
Mon, 30 May 2016 11:55:40 EDT
Fish courtship pheromone uses the brain's smell pathway
Research has revealed that a molecule involved in fish reproduction activates the brain via the nose. The pheromone is released by female zebrafish and sensed by smell receptors in the noses of the males. The neural pathway and brain areas involved in transforming this molecular messenger into courtship behavior in fish were also identified by the researchers.
Mon, 30 May 2016 10:13:08 EDT
Hydrogen synthesis: When enzymes assemble themselves in the test tube
Researchers have engineered a hydrogen-producing enzyme in the test tube that works as efficiently as the original. The protein – a so-called hydrogenase from green algae – is made up of a protein scaffold and a cofactor. The latter is the reaction center where the substances that react with each other dock. When the researchers added various chemically synthesized substances to the protein scaffold, the cofactor spontaneously assembled.
Fri, 27 May 2016 19:05:18 EDT
Organism responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning may affect fisheries
Ingestion of toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense changes the energy balance and reproductive potential of Calanus finmarchicus in the North Atlantic, which is key food source for young fishes, including many commercially important species, say scientists.
Fri, 27 May 2016 12:29:46 EDT
Guarding the gatekeepers
Calcium is a key signalling agent in the information networks of life. As calcium ions cannot cross cell membranes directly, the rise and fall of calcium levels within a cell are controlled through a set of proteins known as the Orai. Researchers have discovered a new player in calcium signalling pathways - a protein named Septin 7 that functions as a 'molecular brake' to Orai activation.
Fri, 27 May 2016 11:26:45 EDT
Fungi: Promising source of chemical diversity
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces a group of previously unknown natural products. With reference to plant isoquinoline alkaloids, these substances have been named fumisoquins. Researchers have now discovered the novel substances while studying the fungal genome. This study shows that fungi and plants developed biosynthetic pathways for these complex molecules independently of each other. These findings make Aspergillus an interesting target for the discovery of novel drugs and their biotechnological production.
Fri, 27 May 2016 09:10:56 EDT
Molds and plants share similar ways in alkaloid biosynthesis
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces a group of previously unknown natural products. With reference to plant isoquinoline alkaloids, these substances have been named fumisoquins. Researchers have discovered the novel substances together with their American colleagues while studying the fungal genome. The family of isoquinoline alkaloids contains many pharmacologically active molecules. This study shows that fungi and plants developed biosynthetic pathways for these complex molecules independently of each other.
Thu, 26 May 2016 15:22:17 EDT
How do you kill a malaria parasite? Clog it with cholesterol
Drexel scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two antimalarial drugs kill Plasmodium parasites. Amidst growing concerns about drug resistance, these findings could help to develop more effective drugs against the disease.
Thu, 26 May 2016 15:19:37 EDT
Targeting metals to fight pathogenic bacteria
Researchers have discovered a unique system of acquisition of essential metals in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This research represents a new potential target for the design of antibiotics.
Thu, 26 May 2016 15:19:33 EDT
Missing link in plant nitrogen fixation process discovered
An important component in the process of nitrogen fixation in plants has been discovered by researchers. They have identified a key protein that facilitates the movement of calcium in plant cells.
Thu, 26 May 2016 15:17:51 EDT
New 'genetic barcode' technique reveals details of cell lineage
By using the gene editing tool CRISPR to create unique genetic 'barcodes,' it's possible to track the lineage of cells in a living organism, a new study reveals.
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