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Molecular Biology News
Wed, 20 Mar 2019 10:22:13 EDT
Active substance from plant slows down aggressive eye cancer
An active substance that has been known for 30 years could unexpectedly turn into a ray of hope against eye tumors. This is shown by a new study. The plant leaves of which contain the tested substance is anything but rare: At Christmas time you can find it in every well-assorted garden center.
Wed, 20 Mar 2019 10:21:14 EDT
Effects on offspring of epigenetic inheritance via sperm
As an organism grows and responds to its environment, genes in its cells are constantly turning on and off, with different patterns of gene expression in different cells. But can changes in gene expression be passed on from parents to their children and subsequent generations? Researchers have now demonstrated that epigenetic information carried by parental sperm chromosomes can cause changes in gene expression and development in the offspring.
Tue, 19 Mar 2019 16:10:08 EDT
Revealing the rules behind virus scaffold construction
New insights into virus shell self-assembly could impact future drug delivery and therapeutic strategies.
Tue, 19 Mar 2019 14:23:06 EDT
Ejecting flagella could help microbes save energy during nutrient depletion
In favorable conditions, many bacteria propel themselves to food sources and other sites of interest using whip-like molecular propellers known as flagella. However, according to new research, members of the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria eject their flagella when nutrients are scarce.
Tue, 19 Mar 2019 12:17:28 EDT
Androgen receptor, treatment target for prostate cancer, imports into mitochondria
Androgens stimulate prostate cancer cells to grow. Many drugs to target that cancer focus on stopping androgen biosynthesis or blocking the androgen receptor, or AR. Researchers have discovered a new function of the AR in prostate cells -- the AR is imported into and localizes to mitochondria of the cell, where it plays a novel role in regulating multiple mitochondrial processes.
Tue, 19 Mar 2019 10:07:57 EDT
Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste
The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society.
Tue, 19 Mar 2019 10:07:43 EDT
Electron accelerators reveal the radical secrets of antioxidants
A professor has demonstrated for the first time the value of linear particle accelerators for the generation of free radicals inside biological samples. This work will have important applications throughout biochemistry, especially for researchers studying antioxidants and photosynthesis.
Fri, 15 Mar 2019 11:59:37 EDT
Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses
Dysregulation of the signaling pathway known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt can also cause embryo malformation and contribute for the development of breast and cervical cancer.
Thu, 14 Mar 2019 15:17:02 EDT
From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins
Scientists have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers' goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their aim is to produce mirror-image therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, which would be protected from biological breakdown in the body and do not provoke any immune response.
Thu, 14 Mar 2019 15:16:23 EDT
How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death
Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. It is also involved in signaling dangerous problems that warrant apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have discovered that the signal induced by cytochrome c is more controlled than expected.
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